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This is what to expect
Off-gridder Lamar has researched the great depression and “gleaned much info from my parents that lived through it” to come up with some useful tips for what, thanks to our great leaders in Washington and New York, will be some real tough times:

1. Don’t worry that your savings and checking account will disappear. FDIC banks are guaranteed for $100.000 per person. Pulling all your savings out will hasten the fall of a bank.

2. If a bank does collapse you may have to wait a few weeks or
months to get your money so have enough cash on hand to get you by
for at least 1 month.

3. If your food storage is in good order thats great but spend a
little more now on essentials that may go up in cost soon. Toilet
paper, feminine supplies, canned goods, dry milk, etc.

4. If you have necessary prescriptions get them filled and keep a
months supply on hand for backup. medicines will stay good longer if
stored in the fridge.

5. Keep your gas tank full and fill at least a 5 gallon can in case
prices skyrocket or supplies get limited. Only drive if absolutely
necessary and car pool as much as possible.

6. Get a bike.

7. If you live where hunting and fishing are plentiful you may want
to invest in a 22 rifle and a fishing pole.

8. Its too late to garden this year but get your seeds early and
plan for next year.

9. It is cheaper for families to pool resources and live
together than try to keep multiple houses if you are struggling with
house payments. Kids can share rooms and adults can sleep on floors
and couches.

10. DON’T PANIC! the great depression didn’t last forever and
neither will this economic trouble. Simplify your life, share, and
keep your family and friends close.

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4 Responses to “10 ways to beat the Depression of 2008”

  1. skylark

    Also remember we are a hard currency. It has its own value in other contrys. We get our oil so much cheaper because of that value. We don’t have to sell goods to get hard currency to buy oil. In 2007 the stuff almost hit the fan when the over seas oil countries tried to change the standard and have another currency be the standard hard currency. It was stoped by one vote. Just one. If they had changed to standard currency our fuel costs would have gone through the roof. $4 a gallon. Think $8-12 a gallon.

    Reply
  2. skylark

    Nice list but there could be some improvments. On number 1 and 2 you should be very worried. There is no time limit for the fdic to pay you if the bank fails. They could take weeks, months or even years. One thing to keep in mind is that the banks were on the gold standard durring the depression. We are not now. I would be more worryed about hyperinflation. And dont say it cant happen to us because we are america. If the government wanted to make more money all they have to do is type a few zeros into the keyboard and they can turn thousands into millions. Slowly pull your savings out and invest is gold and silver. Exspesialy silver. Silver is a commodity that is needed to all our tecnology and some medical supplys. And it cannot be man made. We have used about 90% in the world already. It can’t be recovered. Get a month or 2 of cash and set that asside.
    The points on food are good. Also look at your home and figure out how to heat it. If stuff realy hits the fan in winter and you have no income you want a way to heat your house and keep your family warm. Gas heat costs big. Perhaps put in a wood or corn heater. You are in good if you have a fireplace.

    Reply
  3. jetsetjason

    option 9 sounds good, i always liked the waltons

    http://www.tvrage.com/shows/id-6277

    Reply
  4. Solar John

    And congratulations if you already have an off-grid PV system. You don’t have to worry about an electric bill. If your system is large enough you could provide electricity to others who are also struggling, perhaps in the form of a battery-charging service. You could barter that service for something you need.

    Reply