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Home Forums General Discussion Off-Grid Roofs

This topic contains 8 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  elnav 6 years, 2 months ago.

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  • #36801

    Brie217
    Participant

    I was surprised to find that metal roofs are the best for off-grid houses… But, now I am trying to research people who are using a water catchment system with gravity for showers…anyone?

    http://hubpages.com/_38j6ujm10h7dy/hub/The-Best-Roofing-Systems-for-Off-Grid-Homes

    #41518

    caverdude
    Participant

    Well, I have looked into roofing a bit for this purpose. While I think metal is a great way to go, there is no reason some other types wouldn’t work. In the deep south, along the coast, I see a lot of tile roofing. Tile is expensive, but last 100 years, if its not in freezing locations. Water freezes and cracks tile or slate. Slate would as good I think as tile. The EarthShip books recommend role rubber roofing. This also allows them to mound up dirt on the roof edges to guide the water that is being caught, as well as added thermal mass. Water could be caught from a sodded earth roof if designed properly. For a waterproof membrane I have recommened very thick pond liners. Water doesn’t have to be guttered, it could be caught at ground level. I don’t recommened catching water from asphalt shingles or tared roofs except for use on lawn and yard plants. Other possible roofing materials would be Thatch, wood shakes, tree bark etc. Of those shakes are probably more practical.

    Of the metal roofing we have copper, steel, aluminum, tin. They are painted or galvanized. Id be wary about using water from galvanized roofs for drinking and food prep.

    Copper or painted metal roofs would be great.

    http://larrydgray.net

    http://larrydgray.wordpress.com

    #41523

    elnav
    Member

    Galvanized roofs should not pose a great hazard since the time duration of contact is short. Look how long galvanized piping was in use. I agree that prolonged exposure to galvanizing will leach some metal ions but its nowhere as active as exposure to lead or pewter I worry more about the plastic coatings or fiberglas roofing sheets now in use. Presumably any rain water from a metal roof would be stored in a suitable storage tank. A lime white washed concrete tank would do well.

    #41592

    chowan
    Participant

    Id rather drink rainwater off a galvanised roof than anything else, was drinking it for years in Australia. much more worried about this new plastic

    greenhouse catchment i have.

    I have a painted metal roof because i was reusing secondhand roofing but id rather have a galvanised roof.

    #41593

    caverdude
    Participant

    yes well, I guess galvanized piping has been used for water, I had forgotten. I suppose if water collectged from asphalt or tar roofs was properly filtered it could be used for food or drink. It certainly could be distilled and used for food and drinking.

    http://larrydgray.net

    http://larrydgray.wordpress.com

    #41596

    Dustoffer
    Participant

    I wouldn’t trust even distilled water from bituminous roofing, and what a waste of power! My rainwater catchment roof is non-toxic acrylic. Another kind is the Bermuda roof. Either “real” with flat tiles or the poured light weight concrete into forms. I definitely wouldn’t recommend anything that needs excessive filtration or tends to impart flavors.

    One thing about metal roofs is that they are very slippery and can be dented walking on them to say, seasonally adjust a solar array. However, some glue on rolled solar panels are made specifically for them, and are the most wind resistant.

    My non-catchment roof is regular asphalt shingles, but I may go light weight poured at some time in the future, or recycled aluminum shakes right over the shingles. Both suitable for catchment.

    #41620

    elnav
    Member

    A friend brought this to my attention

    Washington and Utah states are among several western states having regulations governing diversion of rainwater into catchment basins or cisterns.

    Note the word ‘divesion’ which can means any man made redirection of any natural source of water. This evidently includes diverting natural rainwater into man made storage. Yes I know it sounds stupid but then again water rights has been a frequent topic for publicatins like National Geographic over the past 10 years. With possible drought conditions becoming a reality more state authorities are getting stricter.

    http://WWW.naturalnews.com carried an article about one business being charged with infractions of this regulations. Best suggestion is to lie low and don’t get found out if the state you are seting up in have such water rights regulations. Sounds as if the regulations fall under riparean water rules and who has rights to natural water and aquifier water.

    #41622

    caverdude
    Participant

    Now I suddenly do not see Washington and Utah states as being such beautiful looking states to live in. I wonder if it will soon be illegal for your garden and livestock and trees to drink the rain water! I expect soon the government will strap a breath meter on us at birth and tax us for each breath we take until we die. They will say, “Oh you thought the air was everyone’s to share! That’s an old native american ideology. That’s comunism!” If its rain and it’s falling on my land doesn’t that rightfully make it mine! I would say that anyone who would say otherwise would be stealing from me. Might as well be stealing my horse and cattle.

    But yes I know, fighting governmental loopholes (those that are in governmental favor) in the laws will be imposible unless enough people get mad enough about it.

    http://www.naturalnews.com/029286_rainwater_collection_water.html

    here is another article about this..

    http://larrydgray.net

    http://larrydgray.wordpress.com

    #41623

    elnav
    Member

    lARRY that is the article I was talking about. Incidentally if you aren’t upset enough already check into underground mineral rights. You do not necessarly own the rights to minerals located UNDER your property. a MINING COMPANY CAN LAY CLAIM TO THAT AND YOU HAVE NO SAY IN WHAT THEY DO OR HOW MUCH MONEY THEY MAKE FROM IT.

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