MEDIA WORKERS AND TV RESEARCHERS - Please seek permission before posting on this site or approaching individuals found here by phone or email - write to the Editor - mail to nick@off-grid.net


Home Forums General Discussion Finally Purchased my Land

This topic contains 15 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  Amy Jo 2 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #50117

    metroidhntr
    Participant

    So I finally made my purchase.  So stoked about it too.  The only problem now is saving enough money to build and be as self sufficient as possible.  From what I have priced I would need about 60k in order to build and live comfortably.  Which doesn’t seem all that much considering what I need.  I have never been one that is mechanically inclined so I don’t have a collection of tools.  The good news though for me is I pick up on stuff real quick and I am extremely handy when it comes anything that uses electricity and have always been pretty decent and gardening….when I’m not being lazy lol.  I do want to grow as much of my own food as possible, especially if it can be stored for long periods of time with out much attention.  So I am currently 25 and I figure if I save about 10k every year and buy what I can when it’s cheap I should be good to go in about 5 years.  Any advice for things I can work on to save more money. I already go cheap when I can. ie: I make my own laundry detergent and shampoo and conditioner.( which surprisingly saves ALOT of money.

     

    P.S.  Sorry about my paragraph above. I know I need to work on my writing. lol

    #50125

    WrethaOffGrid
    Keymaster

    How cool, without giving out too much information, can you tell us a bit about your property? What state, the terrain, the vegetation, temps, water, acreage, neighbors?

    $60,000 seems like quite a bit of money, what are you planning on building or having built? Is there any work you can do (to earn money) close to where your property is? If so, maybe you could start out smaller, maybe even do one of those Morgan type shed/buildings, finish it out on the inside, live in that for a while then decide if you want to go bigger… a neighbor of mine bought one of those buildings (a wooden one), took out one of the long sides and added a big bump-out to be the livingroom and bedroom, the main part of the building is the kitchen and bathroom, it’s quite nice for the two of them.

    We built the beginning of the sky castle, just one box 16×16 and lived in that quite happily for the first little bit, it ran us a couple of grand, of course that was very primitive, it toughened us up :)

    Wretha

    #50236

    metroidhntr
    Participant

    I purchased 36.9 acres in southern colorado on the west side of walsenburg. It’s right next to a mountain. There isn’t a great deal of rain per year about 20 -30 inches but it snows about the same amount which I can shovel and melt down into storage containers during the winter time.  The reason I named myself such a high prices is because of the few things that are expensive and plus I am pretty much starting from the ground up. I need a foundation 10 x 40 to place a shipping container on, a well to be drilled, plus i need lots of tools.  I would like to start living out there now but unfortunately the nearest town is 30 minutes away which would make for a long trip and lots of gas and that’s if I can even find any work out in that town. I’m great with computers but my skill set probably isn’t really needed too much in a small town, but I will see later on.   I’m currently 25 so my goal is to save up that amount of money in 5-6 years.  I currently live in vegas and live as cheaply as possible to save up as much money as I can.

    #50238

    WrethaOffGrid
    Keymaster

    Depending on the age demographic of the population of the local town, you might be able to use more of your computer skills than you realize, out where I live there are more elderly than anything else, that means many of them don’t know how to use or fix their computers past the basics, just a thought…. also businesses have a great need for tech support, upgrading and such. Being in a small town usually means that getting tech support (if they can even find it) is very expensive, or they end up having to buy all new stuff or go without because their current stuff is either jacked or out of date, I find that most of the time my peeps only need a good cleaning, updating software and such.

    I am glad to see you have set goals though and are actively working on achieving those goals, stick to your guns and don’t give up. Please keep us updated on your progress :)

    Wretha

     

    #50247

    metroidhntr
    Participant

    Never thought about that.  I will have to look into that more.  Hopefully by next year I can have enough money saved up to have a well drilled out on site.  That is one of my main priorities at the moment, just because it makes the land more usable through out the time until I am ready to move out completely.  I do want to build a small little makeshift shack/shed so I have somewhere to sleep while I am out on the land and I have somewhere to store my tools instead of transporting them back to vegas.  My idea is to dig a couple of holes for studd placement and fill it with concrete then. build a floor structure above ground and go from there.  I am going to use treated wood to avoid termite damge.  It seems like a good start for the next year or two

    #50248

    beast
    Participant

    first off, its not that hard drilling your own well, you just need the pipes, the casing, a good water supply in a tank and a good water pump and hoses
    then you jet the well down and it goes pretty quick and easy
    ive also hand augured wells before, lots of work but cheap to do
    next, never concrete in a wooden post, treated or not, the concrete will make it rot
    just pour a pad at the bottom of the hole, place your post and brace it in place
    then drop in a shovelfull of dirt, turn your shovel end for end and use the handle to pack
    the dirt in all the way around the post. pack every scoopful good and hard until the hole is full
    when you do this your post will vibrate like a tuning fork when you tap it
    that is the only correct way to plant any wooden post and it works well on pipes too
    and just so you know, never plant any wooden post with the bark on it
    even good cedar posts are only good a few short years with the bark left on
    bugs and fungus move in under the bark and destroy your post
    with bark on, you get 5 or 6 years from a post
    with bark off, cedar will last 30+ years

    #50250

    metroidhntr
    Participant

    I’m not exactly experienced in the drilling department and i would rather just pay to have it done since my land is on the side of a mountain and I don’t know how bad the rains get and I don’t want to have the well contaminated.

    Now i didn’t know that the concrete could actually cause the wood to rot.  So I will change my plans up on that scale.  How strong is that method of building?

    #50251

    beast
    Participant

    strong enuff that its the legal way by code
    just plant the posts like i said then run your stringers and headers
    organic gardening has a book section, in it youll find several books on pole frame construction
    most libraries have them too and you may find some at amazon.com
    i suggest you look for one and read it, could save ya some probs later on

    #50254

    metroidhntr
    Participant

    all right cool.  Looks like I will have to pick up a few of those books.  Doesn’t seem like it should be too hard to build that type of structure.

    #50750

    metroidhntr
    Participant

    So I talked to the building inspector for the county and it seems like this is going to be a really expensive project for me.  For one I have to have a minimum of 600 Sq Ft to build for a house that is drawn up by a colorado engineer.  I can’t find anything in the laws about foundation but I’m already starting to get the feeling that I will have to have a slab foundation instead of a pier based foundation which is going to cost me a lot of money.  On top of permits and still having to make sure I have a water source that can support 3 people, plants and any small livestock I have and getting solar panels to provide enough electricity to run everything  is going to run me dry.  I understand making the structure safe and sound but this is ridiculous.  Why does the government get to dictate what I need to have.  Any ideas so I can get around this bull crap but still live on my land legally.  I would like to build everything myself, or as much as I can by myself.  The land is in Huerfano county, CO

    #50751

    Marc_uk
    Participant

    What about a trailer? – either factory made or a DIY tiny home.

    I’ve no idea how that would work with the county, but worth looking into?

    #50764

    somanyanimals
    Participant

    A house built on a trailer would get you around building codes. I would dig out a space to park it and put another roof over for extra protection, maybe  a living roof for fun.

    first thing I looked at when buying my land was building restritions.

    #50844

    CadeJ
    Participant

    consider buying and burying a container? A steel shipping container can be pretty inexpensive and the foundation is extremely simple since it is only supported at four very well-defined points – you just need four concrete pads with anchor bolts protruding. They can be stacked 7-high so you will not be likely to bury one too deep to damage it. By going in-ground you will get a lot of temperature stability. I have no idea  about the code issues for that however – welcome to America!

    #50846

    metroidhntr
    Participant

    I am considering buying a container, but I will probably have to have a slab foundation. most of the companies that ship the containers can’t unload a 40 footer with a forklift so pier based foundation might be out of the question.  I have to contact the local laws about using one as a housing unit though and see if I can find any loopholes.  I thought about burring one, but they don’t really recommend it since the containers can have them stacked high the walls are actually extremely weak in that instance and could cause a collapse. Then there is also corrosion you have to worry about.  I don’t think I will need to worry about  cooling though considering where I am at.  It rarely goes above 90 degrees during the day and at night will always plummet back to around 60 degrees.

    #50849

    beast
    Participant

    those containers WILL NOT take side loads from backfill
    they will collapse

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.