enyaelia | |

Hi, I am Eva, a German student currently living in London, UK. 

The idea of living off the grid has always intrigued me. My parents and I lived in very remote regions and I grew up in a very safe, countryside environment. 

At the age of 22 I have traveled parts of the US, Australia, Asia and Europe by myself and have loved my kind of nomadic lifestyle. 

I never liked the idea of being part of the ‘system’, studying, getting a degree, buying a house, working full-time in an office for 40 years to then be old and finally have time to enjoy life. I want to work for myself, be able to make my own ours, be financially independent and not stuck in the rat race for the rest of my days. 

I am currently studying nutrition online and I am here in London to do acting training. The problem with acting is that the best opportunities lie in big metropolitan regions like NYC, LA or London which are – obviously – far from off-the-grid. 

 

I got thinking – how can I imply some of the off-grid principles into my daily life here in such a big city? 

I registered on here to both share my ideas with you but also find like-minded people who might be in a similar situation. 

 

Some of the things I want to do are buying as much local and organic produce as possible, spend time in nature, do a regular phone, social media and technical detox. My flatmates and I also meditate regularly as it helps us to stay sane in the crazy, busy city life. 

RELATED POST  looking for people who want to go off grid.

 

I am curious to know – what are ways that you implement the off-grid-idea into your daily life? 

Are you from the UK and know any off-grid communities or places? I am looking to travel around and learn more about off-the-grid living. 

 

All the best, 

 

Eva 

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6 Responses to “Incorporating off-grid into my daily life”

  1. Eilish McVey

    Hello Eva,

    My name is Eilish, and I am a masters student studying design strategy in Toronto Canada. I am currently working on a project surrounding home energy storage.

    I was wondering if there would ever be a time that we could chat about your interest and experience in off grid living. I am currently in the research phase of the project and I am gathering insight on how those interested in living off grid think about energy use.

    Best

    Eilish

    Reply
  2. Carlos Moura

    Hey Eva,

    I’m also in based in London (working in corporate media for my sins), and one thing I would say to you is to try and implement a daily practice asap and try as much as possible not to veer away from it. If I wasn’t able to maintain a pre-dawn meditation, exercise & prayer routine, I suspect that my levels of discernment and ‘peace’ (as far as that is possible with all the ambient and internal ‘chatter’ in cities) would be far harder to maintain.

    WRT your organic inclinations: if at all possible, try to grow any kind of vegetable that you could eat. It’s far easier than you think and keeps you connected, in however subtle a way, with nature in a very therapeutic way that is not immediately obvious. Start small and focus on the process as opposed to the end product and initial silliness of it (in a city like London).

    Lastly, if you have an intellectually stimulating hobby/job/nutrition/whatever, try to spend more time reading / watching Youtube about that subject (and others) than getting caught in the media vortex of propaganda and nonsense which currently passes for journalism.

    Personally, I have a two year plan of a: skilling myself up on offgrid subjects like sustainable agriculture, cob building, solar and alternative heating etc while b: gradually weaning myself off pointless ‘luxuries’ and habits… before making the transition.

    Last year I spent 21 days alone in the desert and was shocked at how different and liberating the experience was versus what I was subconsciously expecting. I experienced first hand how badly modern humanity is infantilised and corrupted into a being that, in a few generations will be closer to an instinct-driven animal than to a sentient being capable of caring for itself and others.

    Oh! And if you haven’t yet heard of WWOOF yet, check it out as a potential interim measure in your path to personal sovereignty.

    Otherwise, MUCH love and power to you and your adventure!

    Cheers,
    Carlos

    Reply
  3. Roz

    I have been thinking about living off grid on the land, have some basic carpentry skills so can make some things. Love the idea of community organic food farming.

    Reply
  4. tomwoodie

    сool

    Reply
  5. Russ

    Hi Eva have you traveled to Canada. My wife and I live off grid in the boreal forest in Northwest Territories. We have guest cabin and need help with gardens, greenhouses, chickens and mid size rabitry. We try to be self sustainable as much as possible. If interested please feel free to ask questions.
    Regards Russ

    Reply
  6. Fragginz

    Hi Eva,

    I think that it will be hard to implement any “off grid” principles living in the center of a grid and working in the same. I would suggest firstly making small steps to detach from dependencies to the grid: cancel the gym membership, downgrade your apartment, sell the car, etc. Once your overheads are very low you will find that you do not have to earn so much to maintain your life. Then try to visit or stay in country settings with people and get a taste for rural living, where later you may find you have the desire to live and move to more of an off grid or self sufficient lifestyle. I am in East Europe doing just that, if you are ever in that area!

    Reply