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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)
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  • in reply to: additives or gadgets to fix or renew batteries #68338
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    Yup. These were the units we were making back in the early 90’s. They are slow to work, but they do work. You can buy these same inductive units very cheaply on ebay and such as well. It’s basically a boost converter which boosts voltage, stores it in a small cap and then discharges it into the battery.

     

    Tad

    in reply to: additives or gadgets to fix or renew batteries #68343
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    Yes. I’ve built many Bedini boost converters and work with Bedini’s early partner Charlie that used to work with him in the 80’s in California. The Bedini radiant pulser hits the battery with 500-700 volt pulses with a duration of about 1-10 uS. This forces the sulfate crystal back into suspension. Unfortunately it also sheds lead from the plates and if it is done repeatedly the battery will be conditioned to only take a charge from that source and standard high current, low voltage chargers will not charge the battery any longer (they usually immediately race up to show a full charge without delivering any current). If you plan on using that type of system for the rest of the batteries life then it’s no problem.

    Dr. Peter Lindemann, myself and others have documented this strange anomaly with the Bedini type of chargers. I’m not sure if the system has ever been modified by Bedini to eliminate this reaction but for many people it’s not a problem since they use the Bedini system and never go back to a standard type of charger. It may be possible to use the EDTA system to recondition the battery and make the battery handle a normal charging system again, but I’m not sure. I suppose I can try it and tell you how it works.

    Tad

    in reply to: Inverters for Computers #68115
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    480 is a common voltage I work with daily on three phase equipment. And 2400 VDC systems for ionizers. It’s really the same safety precautions when working with 240VAC. It’s certainly not fun to get hit with higher voltages, though I have only been hit once with 2400VDC and once with 480VAC. I use lineman’s gloves (which are good for up to 5KV) for working on the ionizers these days. Of course 180VDC is not much different than 240VAC shock wise and so you are right about the safety precautions.

    Many years ago I was on a job site where a man who was breaking up an old concrete slab punctured a ~10KV main line with a jackhammer and killed him instantly. His friend was running over to push him away from the jackhammer when the foreman yelled “Don’t touch him!”.

    Tad

    in reply to: Using capacitors instead of a battery #68116
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    It would work. I’ve placed 50 farad 12 volt caps in front of the battery bank before and it does add to the total capacity of the system. The issue is that no one that I know of has ever built a massive capacitor bank in order to run from continuously. In theory a 20,000 Farad bank would perform better than any battery chemistry and would have an extreme lifespan compared to even Lithium chemistry batteries. The electric revolution is already here, but the storage side of the equation is still years away. Until Graphene hybrids are available at lead acid prices we will be moving forward at a snails pace. The company I do battery research for is working on these technologies: https://www.caleb-battery.com/

    But it is still an expensive battery because of the materials they use. Graphene batteries show the promise of inexpensive batteries with long life and will perform under extreme abuse (they have shown to take bullet holes and still perform at the same capacity just like Li/Po batteries do).

     

    in reply to: Inverters for Computers #68112
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    The video was shown with no load, but with a load such as a drill or small vacuum it does change the waveform a bit. I am designing an inverter that will take a high voltage DC bank of batteries and convert directly to pure sine wave with no step-up. This should increase efficiency and allow a much smaller footprint for the inverter, and also be much easier on the batteries since they wont have to supply but more than 10 amps per 120VAC leg (double stacked). Charging will change to a simple digitally controlled converter and then into the battery bank. I.E. rectified 240VAC into a 180VDC battery bank digitally controlled by two triacs (phase control).

    This setup should simplify power conversion, increase efficiency and greatly increase the life of the battery bank. Basic testing of this system shows a set of 30 Trojan T-105’s that barely have to do any work (10-20amp max load and 5 amps constant) so it looks promising so far. Charging from the panels will be simple since we just take a high voltage string of panels and use a PID control loop to handle direct charging of the bank of batteries from the panels without step-up or step-down. This also allows me to run my 240VAC welders from the source instead of firing up a generator.

    My desktop is required for my work as well since I design circuitry, program microcontrollers and make simple communication apps in CSharp for them. I use the UPS’s for power outage situations only, but I would never go back to modified sine wave to run this system and the rest of the house. It’s just not financially worth it for me to run anything but pure sine wave.

    <span style=”line-height: 1.5em;”>Tad</span>

    in reply to: additives or gadgets to fix or renew batteries #67997
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    Cool! I would send Charlie an email. dcon at frontiernet dot net. If you could get his website fixed up that would be great!

     

    Tad

    in reply to: Inverters for Computers #67985
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    They should work fine but will buzz. It’s harder on the internal capacitors, and they will use a little more power than on pure sine.

     

    Tad

    in reply to: additives or gadgets to fix or renew batteries #67986
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    Well I’m glad you don’t think it’s too bad = ) Charlie really does need to have an experienced web designer work on it a little though. I will keep at it here on the BatteryForce reconditioners. I’m hoping to have them available for late spring.

     

    Tad

    in reply to: additives or gadgets to fix or renew batteries #67978
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    Hi. Which website did you go to? I have not put up a website yet. Just some demo videos so far.

    Thanks for the input you guys.

    Tad

     

    in reply to: additives or gadgets to fix or renew batteries #67981
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    Ah, yes, that website is horrible. I had a very nice looking website design up that looked similar to other professional stove websites, but Charlie said he did not know how to modify it so he used frontpage or something and created some early 1990’s looking page. I was really dismayed at putting the time in to make a nice looking one then seeing him take a huge step backwards, but he is the project founder on the stove so I just let him figure it out.

    You should send him an email and ask him if he wants help with the website, he would probably pay you to keep it looking nice. I think they are starting to make money with the stove, which was my goal. The stove really works nice so I was helping them get the stove demo’s and such done. I helped with the engineering and getting the files to the Cnc machine shop so they could start producing them.

    I am fairly close on getting the Small and medium sized Battery reconditioners in production. The power supply design is what I am working on right now. I am just a one man show so it takes me a long time to get engineering done. If I could work on it full time it would be a breeze, but I would need to get it put up on Kickstarter or something in order for me to do that.

    Tad

    in reply to: additives or gadgets to fix or renew batteries #67973
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    I’m moving along slowly but surely……. Here is a video of one of the prototypes.

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vm2hamjCfCI

    in reply to: Inverters for Computers #67916
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    The computer will run on any waveform that reaches a high enough voltage, but over time modified sine wave inverters will usually destroy the capacitors in the computer power supply. Sometimes this can take months, sometimes a few weeks, and in some cases even a few days. People have run computers from modified sine wave inverters for years, but it all depends on how well the power supply was made, how good the components are that they built the supply with, etc.

    In my case I have seen my desktop power supplies go bad within one year. I have also lost DirectTV receivers within one year. If the power supply is made as a DC converter with high quality components and is engineered well then they can last for years with no problems on modified sine.

    Running straight filtered DC from panels etc directly into the device (if it is a dc-dc converter) would be easier on it than modified sine wave.

     

    Tad

    in reply to: Inverters for Computers #67918
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    Yup. It all depends on the harshness of the waveform. The shape of the waveform makes a huge difference. Let’s see an oscilloscope shot of your output and that will tell us why. Or the model number of the inverter, I may have one here. Are they all DR2424’s? All motors will be about 10-15 percent less efficient on modified, and that power loss will show up as heat, but in general they should run fine.

    Nowadays the sinewave inverters are so inexpensive that it’s no longer as much of a cost savings to go with modified, but back in the day it was for sure. I still run a small DR12 series on job sites once in a while, but the house has been changed over to a SW4024 since I got it for free damaged and repaired the circuit boards.

    in reply to: Inverters for Computers #67874
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    The best way to know for sure is to get a screen shot of an oscilloscope output of the waveform. Most inverter manufacturers are showing the waveform output on their website. Here is one that I tested in the lab to show what a stepped modified waveform looks like.

    <embed width=”440″ height=”420″ type=”application/x-shockwave-flash” src=”https://v6.tinypic.com/player.swf?file=2is2h3&s=6″&gt;

    The above inverter company (PowerJack) now makes these inverters as true sinewave.  The plugs were universal plugs and not just euro plugs, as I was mistaken.

    Of course pure sine wave looks like this:

    Image and video hosting by TinyPic

    Waveform shaping can certainly be done with an LC filter. You will need to play with the values of the components but you can certainly soften the waveform a bit. As for filtering enough to get a pure sine wave from a modified, it would require alot of testing. A laptp can run a large LCD/LED screen off the port in the back. Laptops now come with both VGA and HDMI output on them to run large monitors or even TV’s from the output.

     

    Tad

    in reply to: Inverters for Computers #67875
    MrEnergy
    Participant

    Video of powerjack modified output on scope:

    [URL=https://tinypic.com/m/funino/2]PowerJack PSW interver output[/URL]

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)