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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 74 total)
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  • in reply to: shelter in the wild #67769
    Cahow
    Participant

    Wretha wrote: “Don’t you carry cement powder and slip forms in your backpack??? :)”

    Normally, I do. But in this case, I had to make room for my 52″ flat screen tv. ;)

    in reply to: Where to start? #67761
    Cahow
    Participant

    Lady April: you beat me to it! Thank you for recommending that cautionary tale of a film about that stupidly selfish “Alexander Supertramp” aka Christopher MacCandeless. THIS post isn’t the first one I’ve read at this site from young Millennial males who either want to copy Christopher (you mean, DYING!?)  or hold him in the same light as Thoreau. His taking risks to extremes was eventually his hubris which led to his downfall. And by the way, he didn’t “poison” himself by eating the wrong food; that’s been proven to be pure fiction for the film. He died of starvation, down to 80 pounds when found after his death by a pair of moose hunters.

    In his book, Jon Krakauer went to where Christopher died and found that there had been a bridge less than 1/4 mile from the bus he perished in, leading to town.  In addition, the author describes at some length the grief and puzzlement of McCandless’s parents, sister, and friends over Christopher’s rejection of everyone and everything in his life.

     

    Boogey: here are two quotes about Christopher and his plan, which mirrors yours:

     

    Alaskan Park Ranger Peter Christian wrote:

    When you consider McCandless from my perspective, you quickly see that what he did wasn’t even particularly daring, just stupid, tragic, and inconsiderate. First off, he spent very little time learning how to actually live in the wild. He arrived at the Stampede Trail without even a map of the area. If he [had] had a good map he could have walked out of his predicament [… ] Essentially, Chris McCandless committed suicide”

    Sherry Simpson, writing in the <i>Anchorage Press</i>, described her trip to the bus with a friend, and their reaction upon reading the comments that tourists had left lauding McCandless as an insightful, Thoreau-like figure:

    Among my friends and acquaintances, the story of Christopher McCandless makes great after-dinner conversation. Much of the time I agree with the “he had a death wish” camp because I don’t know how else to reconcile what we know of his ordeal. Now and then I venture into the “what a dumbshit” territory, tempered by brief alliances with the “he was just another romantic boy on an all-American quest” partisans. Mostly I’m puzzled by the way he’s emerged as a hero<sup class=”reference” id=”cite_ref-13″>.”</sup>

    in reply to: shelter in the wild #67767
    Cahow
    Participant

    LOL, beast!

    Since this is your thread, when I read that response, I just sat on my hands, hoping you’d see it and respond.

    Thanks for not disappointing! ;)

    in reply to: New Member Introduction #67692
    Cahow
    Participant

    ” but paying rent is almost painful to me. : )”

     

    Yes, but that’s the cost of being a Grown Up, now, isn’t it?! (LOL) Our excess furniture alone had a replacement value of over $150,000.00 so having 3 storage units @ $50 bucks a piece was a no brainer. As I mentioned, we gifted almost everything away to our 3 kids as they got their own homes and neighbors in need. One of our dear friends had a fire out here that destroyed 100% of their home, down to ashes. Just having a nice futon bed, extra kitchen stuff and clothing helped put their life back together again while they were rebuilding. :) They rebuilt their garage first, and moved in while the home was being rebuilt.

     

    And I love your comment about the “arbitrary standards” that that woman imposes on her life. I sometimes wonder if some of these folks suffer from some type of pyschological issue that forces them to restrain themselves so heavily. Only allowing yourself two pairs of shoes, 3 shirts, x-amount of books…..Good Lord! Life is Waaaaay too short to place those type of restrictions on one’s self. She writes that she won’t “…allow any new thing into her tiny home without removing one item.” Jeepers! :-O  Another famous tiny house lover only allows “one piece of art in my home at a time, and I remove it after 3 weeks..” (do to sensory overload.) All I can say is, “Glad it’s not ME!”

    in reply to: New Member Introduction #67693
    Cahow
    Participant

    Can’t edit posts. :( Meant “due to”, not “do to..”

    in reply to: shelter in the wild #67673
    Cahow
    Participant

    This is a tongue-in-cheek reply, beast. First, if I were in BFE, I had to get there somehow. I mean, it’s not like I was air-dropped into NoWhere’sVille. So, I’d hike right back to the sturdy vehicle that I arrived in and take shelter there! You didn’t state HOW LONG you’d need a shelter but people have survived in vehicles for weeks or a month when they’ve slid into ravines. A vehicle is water-proof, cozy, has a soft place to lie down and if you’re prepared (as you well should be if you’re traveling to BFE) you should have plenty of water, dehydrated foods and a blanket or two.

    So there’s my answer. ;)

    in reply to: New Member Introduction #67688
    Cahow
    Participant

    Joel: there’s no need for you to know the “unknown” as of now. Just continue doing what you’re doing and don’t let anyone else push you into bad ideas that will not affect them but will surely affect you. When we bought our 800 sq.ft. cottage 16 years ago, I furnished it with stuff from all my past lives. When we sold our 1,800 sq.ft. home in Chicago and moved to the cottage permanently, I gifted away some of the things at the cottage and used our City Stuff to add to the mix. The remainder went straight into 3 storage units. We hung onto the extra stuff for 5 years: gifting away “this & that” to whomever needed it, gradually reducing the unit down to 1/2 of one single unit. By then, we knew exactly how much storage we needed for Christmas Decorations/Winter Clothes/Skis, etc. We have zero regrets for how we finally reduced down our belongings: as the kids went off to Uni, they picked through the extra furniture/dishes and took them off to campus; local friends in Michigan who were cash-strapped we helped out by gifting sofas/clothing, etc.

    As long as YOU can afford the storage units, tell any Busy Body to “STFU and Mind Your Own Bees-Wax!” (LOL)

    in reply to: Rain rain beautiful rain #67679
    Cahow
    Participant

    Well, Wretha, our Spring Weather this year in Chicago/Michigan was horrid…simply horrid. Between last year and this year, we’ve only known two extremes: killing drought or terrible flooding. Last year, we began Spring with temperatures in the 90’s…in Michigan!!!!!!! We’re supposed to be in the low 40’s, maybe. Michigan is a major supplier of fruit and vegetables to many states and we got destroyed over here. All the grapes, peaches, apples, etc., fruited  out in frickin’ MARCH…there were NO BEES around at that time, and then the rug got pulled out from under us and we got freezing normal temps in April, killing all the flower buds. So, 100% of Michigan’s peach and grape crop was wiped out and 75% of our apple crop. :( The rest of 2012 was drought, drought, drought….as a landscape architect, we’ve never put in so many irrigation systems in our 23 years of business. The poor farmers: NONE have irrigation up here so their crops were destroyed. We normally have so much rain that having irrigation would be ‘plum foolish.’

    Now, in 2013, here’s our stats: April: coldest and wettest April in 140 years of record keeping! May had double the amount of rain that’s normal (22.3″ vs 13.1″). So, fruiting is delayed, crops planted are delayed, etc. by about 4-5 weeks. The fact that it’s almost the 4th of July and our JUNE strawberries are just coming in…well, that tells it all. Our corn should be “knee high by the 4th of July”; corn in the fields right now is less than 12″. Beans (soy) are just green “fuzz” in the rows, not even high enough to count. But..we haven’t had to irrigate a thing! (LOL)

    We’re worn out, emotionally. We’ll get freeze warnings for Mother’s Day and Memorial Weekend followed by four 80 degree days. Last week, our temps dropped 48 degrees in two hours: we were at 92 degrees in the morning with the air conditioners blasting, and at night, our furnaces were turned on against the 44 night temps. We go through 4 seasons of clothing on days like that: starting with jackets and sweaters and ending up in shorts and t’s.

    This has been a wacky two years we’re living through. I guess “it makes life interesting.” ~shrug~

    in reply to: Single women living off grid #67676
    Cahow
    Participant

    Thanks for your answer, rbonuc29. I learned a lot. Hope you find somewhere that brings you peace.

    in reply to: Single women living off grid #67671
    Cahow
    Participant

    rbonuc29: Why not move to Canada? They  have 35 million people in total with some of their provinces having as little as 41,000 people! It’s a heck of a lot closer to escape to than Australia and if you get found and booted out, well, they don’t have far to toss you back in the U.S.

    I’ve tried following your train of thought, rbonuc29, and it sounds like you wish there was a Magic Button that you could push, bringing the U.S. back to the 1920’s-1940’s. Is that correct? People begat people who begat other people: that’s just the way it is. You can’t get any angrier at future generations than past generations could get angry at your parents  for having you and wanting to house and feed you. Perhaps if you left the state of Florida you’d be happier?

    in reply to: New Member Introduction #67672
    Cahow
    Participant

    Welcome, Joel. You wrote: ” I have a very large shop, plus raw materials and supplies. I hesitate to give up much of the shop for several reasons.” What kind of “stuff”? The kind that can make you money? Well, that’s a GOOD thing! Skilled manual labor is always in demand and is a great way to barter for items that you might need in the future. You paid for your supplies and tools with “yesterday’s money”; trying to replace them at current cost would be a  bloody fortune if you dumped them and then realized your mistake.

    Have you ever thought of relocating your dream North of the Mason/Dixon Line? There’s tons of foreclosed homes in Michigan with great water, clean air and low population. Your dream might still be able to happen if you “Go North, Young Man!” ;)

    in reply to: (NEW) Poll – Do you buy anything in bulk? #67683
    Cahow
    Participant

    I love your water tank repurposing. LOL GREAT recycling!  I use to can extensively when my business was small but it takes too much time, in contrast to freezing. All I need to do is blanch veggies, direct freeze fruit and Bob’s Your Uncle…food for a year. I love to bake but HATE to “cook”, so that’s why I make large batches of savory food and freeze it; I really have to be “in the mood” for all that darn chopping, seeding, sauteing, etc. You don’t have to chop flour and brown it before you use it. ;)

     

    P.S. Wretha: I really enjoy how you describe your life. It really seems like you’ve found a great balance. <3

    in reply to: (NEW) Poll – Do you buy anything in bulk? #67674
    Cahow
    Participant

    Hey, Wretha. As you explained both your background and your current situation, it makes PERFECT SENSE to shop the way that you do! I thought I had it bad with a 40 mile round trip to the grocery store but THREE FRIGGIN’ HOURS???!!!!! Honey…I’d build a special hut just for bulk items if that was how far from town that I lived! (LOL) We have two upright deep freezers and an inline gas generator that kicks in when we have frequent storms, to power up the house. I guess I do “bulk” by making extra large batches of prepared food so I don’t have to cook every day. So, we’ll have 20 servings of chili, soups, casseroles; baked goods; chopped veggies and loads of frozen fruit to enjoy. If that qualifies as bulk, I guess I do bulk, too. Right now, Michigan Strawberries are in their prime and since last weekend, I’ve frozen 50 quarts. That should take us until next June to finish off. Next comes blueberries and then peaches…Lordy, Lordy…fresh peaches in January….m-m-m-m-m-m–m!

    in reply to: New Member Introduction #67686
    Cahow
    Participant

    Hi, Joel. Well, I for one will NEVER advocate someone boiling their life down to a tin cup and a tarp. At a tiny home forum I frequent, one member with waaaaay too much OCD, actually counts the items in her tiny home and won’t allow the number to exceed 100. Good Grief…your life is reduced to that!?! How tragically silly and severe. Get on a new drug, girlfriend!

    Allow me to offer you some sage advice: DON’T GET RID OF ANYTHING, YET!!! Find your place, move into it with what you “think” you’ll need, and toss the remainder into storage. Promise yourself that “One Year from Now, whatever I don’t need, I’ll sell/donate/pitch.” Then, revisit that promise a year later and revise it if you desire.

    When my much beloved Mother-In-Law moved in with my husband and I from Minnesota to Chicago, she thought “Oh, I won’t need my washer or dryer or sewing machine or freezer or….any longer” so she gave it all away to charity. She moved into her own floor of our two-flat and pretty soon, she’d say, “Oh, I sure miss having my washer and dryer on the same level so I don’t have to go up and down all those stairs!” or “I sure wish I had my sewing machine so I could make some drapes for my new home.”

    You see where I’m going with this. Within a year’s time, my husband and I had to buy all new things for his Mum, so she’d be happy and live a full life. (by the way, I cherished her until the day she passed on).

    It makes my blood boil when I read from so many people that “things tie you down”, “stuff anchors you”, blahblahblah. Maybe their stuff ties them down but mine doesn’t! I have inherited all the amazing antiques that were my relatives and my 3 children already know who’s getting what so there’s no fights. I LOVE my “stuff” as it ties me to my roots and has a story with each item. Each time I bake, I use the 1920 Hoosier Cabinet that was my Granpa’s wedding gift to my Granma. I use her rolling pin to roll out  biscuits, I use her biscuit cutter to make them and place them in a hand-carved catalpa wood bowl that Granpa carved for an anniversary present. HOW heartless does a person need to be to “get rid of that crap?”

    So, Joel, do what’s right for you. You only get one chance at tossing something; don’t kick yourself in the b-hind for the rest of your life because you didn’t follow your heart.

    in reply to: Single women living off grid #67681
    Cahow
    Participant

    rbonuc29: you mentioned that “Canada was cold”. Well, so are Montana and North Dakota, Sir! (LOL) British Columbia actually has a beautiful mild climate in a great many areas. 75% of the province is forested which makes for good hunting. Take a road trip. Cross the border. Toss your passport and head into the woods. They speak English there, too!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 74 total)