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Home Forums General Discussion Want to go off-grid

This topic contains 26 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Cahow 4 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)
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  • #45225

    leahh
    Participant

    Are you wanting to make connections with anyone for support and help and someone to talk to while you make plans to go off grid?

     

    #45226

    leahh
    Participant

    Im looking to go off grid. Any single parents looking to go off grid that want to exchange ideas and talk about it and make it reality. I dont want to feel alone as I do this. Even experienced off-grid people can be of support I am sure. I see a lot of families and couples do this on their own but what about us single parents? Should we throw in the towel? Let me know what you think.

    #45229

    chowan
    Participant

    Personally i think a off grid lifestyle is great for children but the initial setup can be difficult and i dont think kids need to go through all of that

    if you can get off grid and setup to provide for yourself and your kids why not?

     

    An old timer here told me about a couple and a young baby that came to this area totally unprepared for the winter

    ended up with no liquid water, no food and the only heat they had was a cut off 55 gallon drum inside a old fifth wheel

    without even a chimney to get the smoke out.He says he bought them a meal and a one way ticket back to california.

    #45243

    leahh
    Participant

    Well I’ve been thinking too much about it and afraid to take my kids who think moving out of California is crazy when we have beautiful weather, ocean views, running water and shopping centers everywhere. Perhaps I can tell them it is like camping. They might like an evening without police sirens and hearing crickets instead of traffic. I guess a good stove and plenty of wood is a must for the winter. I don’t even know how to can food yet, I don’t think I can do this without more support. I need some good neighbors and maybe some friends and family.

    #45246

    chowan
    Participant

    It sounds like you have a bit of a learning curve maybee you could start slow with weekend camping trips practicing wilerness living the kids love that sort of stuff or getting away for a few weeks at a time.Im not sure if you have the resources to get yourself a piece of dirt to start building a weekender but that may be an option.

    maybee you can find a well established community that you could spend some time with on occasion.

     

    I dont think you should take the kids for more than a weekend before you at least have your priorities met

     

    your survival priorities

    protection,location,water,food

    your human needs

    frienship,love,community

     

     

    #45247

    LivingitNow
    Participant

    Hi…Chowan above has given some great advice.  We started our Homestead this past summer and have had a great time at it.  We didnt have everything ready to go BUT did have all the basics and important things.  We have a young child and he has adpated well to the lifestyle and loves everything about it.  We love not hearing hardly any traffic and there is zero crime where we bought our land.  We are accepting other people to live with us at our Homestead. If you are interested, feel free to contact us at redwateracres@yahoo.com or even if you have more questions on how we started and are living our life.  We don’t mind sharing our experiences.  You can have your dream if you want it. Take care and good luck.

    #45248

    leahh
    Participant

    What state are u homesteading in and what are you doing for income? Farming?  Yes some good ideas are presented and its giving me new thought. It isnt easy for me to travel every weekend or even every month. That takes a lot of money for me to travel with 2 kids on my own on a tight budget. I would rather save for a cabin. I think going for a whole summer is more reasonable but even then it will be difficult without my family who want to stay here. When my car breaks down or there is an emergency and my son needs to be picked up for school , they are always there for me.  This is why I am desiring to talk to other single parents.

    #45251

    LivingitNow
    Participant

    Hey Leahh…I don’t mind sharing specifics with you but don’t want to do it on this public site.  Again, my email address is redwateracres@yahoo.com.  Please contact me there. Thanks.

    #45269

    Nick Rosen
    Keymaster

    Thanks Livingitnow – I want to introduce messaging for situations like this – Leahh – please also see some of the latest landbuddy posts – a SoCal community looking for members

    #45276

    leahh
    Participant

    thanks Livingitnow but I dont want to stay in California. I think the best states are Utah, Idaho and Wyoming and maybe Oklahoma but I think that is not possible for a single mom like me. Especially because where I live it never snows!  I know some people will not like this comment but I think you need a man with you to live in a harsh climate.   The states Im looking at is Texas and Arizona.  New Mexico has nice land but their government is corrupt. Colorado is beautiful but now they have all these Democratic freaky politicians trying to take away your guns.  I hope there are some single ladies looking for land right now that we can maybe support each other.

    #45362

    hippyman
    Participant

    Hi, I just joined, and found this post.  I have been wanting to go off the grid for as long as I can remember, preferably via Earthship.  I am looking at some family land, in North-central Texas, right now, not sure when I will be able to afford to build though.  Has anyone on here had any experience with earthships before?

    #45369

    Pahana Tribe
    Participant

    LOL I love that name… Well Hippyman nothing wrong with your idea and a Earthship is a great home…

    However that said its a expensive build unless your a major recycler and able to spend a great deal of time scrounging.

    If your on a tight budget I would suggest a earthen hobbit house to start… A: The insulation factor will help in both the extreme summer heat and mild but chilly winter, the rocket stove mass heater system is also easy, affordable and will provide heat and a cooking space immeadiatly with very little wood for fuel.

    If you have inherited land that is a huge plus but find out about water suply. A well can be expensive if there isnt already one there and lugging water although doable eats gas and is a constant pain. Also check local building codes for septic… I say this because THAT is another big expense… Some area allow composting toilets if you construct them properly…

    Outside of that these things could make the build easier… If there are shade trees a camper / trailer will do while you build but planning is essential and location determines a lot of the planning.

    #45370

    hippyman
    Participant

    What do you consider a major recycler?  Already, I have several boxes of cans and bottles saved up, and have turned my whole family into recyclers.

    #45427

    Dustoffer
    Participant

    I built my Earthship 1999-2000, so any questions—fire away!!!

    #45435

    Pahana Tribe
    Participant

    @Hippy

    Dust obviously would be better qualified to answer the recycling questions for Earthship construction but from a Earthen builder opinion bottles can be used with rammed earth and cans for shingles and passive solar heating tubes.

    Bottles: http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.385600118183208.89455.330603263682894&type=3
    http://media-cache-ec4.pinterest.com/550x/46/b8/96/46b896b339d5a9ba829e951c822c934f.jpg

    Those are components that can be easily intergrated into a Earthship design no doubt but along with that auto / truck tires are a primary component for structural walls. It is simply my opinion but from a build standpoint some areas are quite difficult to acquire tires do to disposal regulations and also can be prohibited by building codes.

    Earthbag construction is inexpensive and simple as well as haybale or rammed Earth so structurally it can get off the ground quicker, less expensive and although you may still have hurdles in zoning it is a bit easier to get green structures looked at vs. what some perceive to be trash… (Tires I Mean)

    Hobbit and Straw example. http://www.apictureofsustainability.com/prizes/judges-choice-category/

    As you can see from the link I provided 90% of your structural build components with these designs comes from the land around you and scrap wood that can be recycled from pallets and clear cutting someones brush. The rest is straw, mud and elbow grease…

    So if your a major recycler your home can be started for very little by simply visiting the back of loading docks for pallets, farmers who have cheap or old hay to sell / barter / or trade.

    Hope that helps a little but not know where you are and what the over all plan is makes it hard to direct you on recycling needs.

    The link to my FB page has several photo albums with ideas for free and its a good place to start to form a concept you have in mind :)

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