MEDIA WORKERS AND TV RESEARCHERS - Please seek permission before posting on this site or approaching individuals found here by phone or email - write to the Editor - mail to nick@off-grid.net


Home Forums General Discussion Using Wood Stoves for Off-Grid Cooking

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  caverdude 5 years, 3 months ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #37120

    Brie217
    Participant

    One of the best things about going off the grid is using a wood stove for cooking. They are beautiful, comforting and efficient. Here is a bit about using wood stoves for cooking off the grid.

    http://brie-hoffman.hubpages.com/hub/Using-Wood-Stoves-for-Off-Grid-Cooking

    #42775

    caverdude
    Participant

    I have an article here about wood burning stoves, fireplaces, ovens et.

    I looked at your link and there are some interesting video’s there.

    Yes wood cook stoves are expensive. I’d like to try to make a homemade one

    sometime out of standard steel and KAO wool.

    http://blog.larrydgray.net/2011/11/28/wood-burning-stoves-and-fire-places

    #42776

    Dustoffer
    Participant

    I bought my Vogelzang Box Wood Stove model BX26E for $150 and the pipes and ceiling box for close to the same 12 years ago. In winter we often use it to cook on. In summer we often use our $170 Global Sun Oven.

    #42782

    elnav
    Member

    For summer use a solar stove is a good alternative. This website show models that work at night.

    https://www.engineeringforchange.org/news/2012/02/04/ten_solar_cookers_that_work_at_night.html

    #42783

    Dustoffer
    Participant

    That solar collector thermal mass night cooker looks very expensive. We just eat our solar cooked food earlier or eat it not as warm later(behavior change). Our cooking period is sometimes a few hours, and on a good day 6 hours after the half hour preheat. The Global Sun Oven works in outside air temperatures 40*F and above. When it is colder we are using the wood stove to heat the house and cook.

    #42788

    elnav
    Member

    The link I provided had 10 different stoves and not all of them were expensive thermal mass. Your comment about time of day only applies to evening meal. Morning meals and coffee or similar hot drink poses a problem since solar heat does not develop in the early morning. Therefore some kind of heat storage is required. I have not yet seen any system that uses zeolite storage technology.

    According to the Gizmag article one of the principal benefits of zeolite is the long term storage of heat without loss. That would be ideal for next day morning use.

    Technology that requires extensive social re-engineering is more problematic to gain acceptance by people.

    #42795

    Riverrat
    Participant

    We have a Vogelzang wood heater with the two eyes on the top for winter usage. It’s cool that it can also be used to cook on.

    We just recently purchased an antique but in solid condition Roman Eagle wood cook stove for the outdoor kitchen, I also plan to build a masonry oven to compliment it.

    We are building our primary kitchen outside of the home to avoid raising the temperature inside the home from cooking. We eventually intend to buy a really nice modern wood burning cook stove to put inside the home in the kitchen and it will add additional heating in the winter when it’s just too cold to cook outside. Since I live in Alabama, that’s not often lol.

    #42796

    caverdude
    Participant

    I’ve heard of folks that move the kitchen inside in winter and outside in summer before. I was just sitting here thinking that a good idea might be to build the kitchen on a deck, screened in with a tarp roof. Then in summer just roll the roof back. The military kitchen tents have a raised section above stoves so that the heat rises into that section and out. Another great idea might be to simply build a lofty area over the kitchen with large vent windows all the way around and open them during summer. Or at least over the stoves and ovens. Restaurants of course have large hoods and powerful vent exhaust fans for the same reasons.

    http://blog.larrydgray.net

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.