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Home Forums General Discussion The Law as to living off the land

This topic contains 13 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  caverdude 5 years ago.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #36762

    mattbatt
    Participant

    If you pack up and equip yourself to go and live as far away from humanity as possible ie: Alone in the Wilderness, the story of Dick Proenneke. Can you A. legally do so,(living alone and living off the land in remote nothingness) B. Do it as a foreigner ( I am British, and have chosen America for the vast space and abundance the country offers).

    #41143

    Nick Rosen
    Keymaster

    I believe that if you do this on public land then you can live this way. Can anyone else comment?

    #41144

    Dustoffer
    Participant

    Permits for camping are required in all government owned land areas. They are generally for two weeks, maximum, and with various fees. Wilderness areas are patrolled and strictly enforced to keep out people living illegally on public land or other illegal activities such as growing marijuana.

    What the hell are all these off subject car and truck posts?????

    Spam attackers???

    #41145

    revinger
    Participant

    YES to it being “spam attackers”

    #41146

    elnav
    Member

    Mattblatt

    In Canada, anything not specifically owned by private interest is designated crown lands. the crown may lease specific lots for some specific use such as cattle grazing, forestry, etc. Conservation officers patrol by off-road 4X4 vehicles or helicopters and planes to track wild life herd movement and look for poachers. Any non permitted use would be noticed and draw curiosity. During the summer fire season the normal patrols are supplemented by fire watchers in planes. Any campfire would immediately draw attention due to the total fire ban in much of the wilderness areas.

    This why I have always maintained the best approach is to buy a lot and establish a ‘hunting camp’. The shelter being temporary does not need a building permit and the vacation use designation explains the presence of an occupant. If you are not actually hunting or fishing out of season then you are simply vacationing and thus still legal. Just watch the fire ban. Even cooking fires are banned during high fire risk periods. You need to use enclosed stoves.

    With so many grow-ops now being located off grid in the outback you can expect aerial surveillance everywhere followed by a ground vehicle visit.

    #42595

    UnhookedLiving
    Participant

    @Mattblatt – Good advice from elnav. Also, drones are now being used to “patrol the border” so your activities in the forest will be even more compromised.

    #42599

    caverdude
    Participant

    You guys might enjoy my post http://blog.larrydgray.net on Survival Camping Arkansas and Area.

    You might consider a hunting lease, as this would not be expensive. It would allow you to camp there indefinitely as long as you are leasing the land. I mean who cares if you are living 24/7/365 in a deer camp. I agree I’m a bit angry about someone in the land of the free telling me I have to spend any amount of money per month for living if I don’t want too. I should have the right to live in a pup tent If I like

    In Arkansas my brother is leasing 640 acres a square mile for $2800 a year, or $233 per month. You could find smaller acreages at better rates. You could also find much better rates out west most likely.

    http://blog.larrydgray.net

    #42601

    Dustoffer
    Participant

    I think this is a very important paragraph from your site, Larry:

    “Only kill to eat what is in season and that is if you have the proper licenses. Some survival eatables do not have seasons and can be killed and eaten any time. Example might be snakes, turtles, lizards and frogs. I’m not sure about which birds might be kosher. Maybe Crow, Sparrow, Black Bird, Blue Jay, Robbin etc. Otherwise it most likely has a season and a license or stamps or whatever. And some are banned anytime anywhere. See the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission web site for further details. Also if you stop by Wal-Mart they have a free booklet in their hunting/fishing section on hunting and fishing regulations. Of course in a real survival situation you would use that regs book for fire starting.”

    I think some of the “live off the land” types are poachers and care little about laws and regulations or species and limits. Just like some “off-grid” types care little about codes, permits, engineering or other regulations, requirements, and laws.

    #42602

    caverdude
    Participant

    I had to read that twice then saw the end “. Should have left a blank line there. Yes I would agree.

    #42614

    UnhookedLiving
    Participant

    RE Dustoffer: There are places with wild pig problems in the US and you can kill as many as you want.

    #42615

    UnhookedLiving
    Participant

    I am in the Inland Northwest (WA, ID, Western Montana) and it has not been my experience to require a permit on all public land. I have camped in undeveloped National Forest w/o needing a permit. The only rule is you have to move every 14 days. However, there are many other regulations in the US that can hinder your off grid living adventure. You have to look at state and county laws as well as federal. For example, in Washington State, it is very difficult to live a natural existence in the woods due to laws against burning wood. During the dry months of summer, you can usually have a bonfire in an approved campground, but not out in the primitive areas — not even on your own rural land. The neighboring state of Idaho is more relaxed. This is just one of many considerations. You may be interested in my book The Truth About Simple Unhooked Living, which discusses a lot of these regulations, based on my personal experience.

    #42625

    Dustoffer
    Participant

    I just read an article in American Rifleman (or Outdoor Life–at the doctor’s office) where land owners are charging exorbitant fees to hunt problem wild hogs. They want to get some money back on the damage the hogs have done. Unfortunately, the hunters have to also consider their travel expenses, too. It is not worth it for me to travel and pay a fee to kill a pest. Here in CO you have to pay a fee to get on the lottery to hunt in various areas for either deer or elk. If you lose, then you get just some of your money back (most lose, because there are far more hunters than animals available to take). Other areas in the east have a whitetail overpopulation problem, and the smart ones even have an urban bow hunting season.

    I would sure like to know where they are allowing the all you can get free with wild hogs. Maybe in those areas you could “live off the land”.

    #42630

    UnhookedLiving
    Participant

    @dustoffer. Oklahoma, according John Milandred, (Prepper Podcast Network) who has an off grid place there. Not all states have those lotteries, you just buy a license and go hunt.

    #42633

    caverdude
    Participant

    In Arkansas you can kill hogs any way you like any time anywhere and leave them laying. You can spot light them at night, use traps or dogs. Only exception is that on government land where you have to use the gun for the season that’s in and have a hunting license and can’t use full metal jackets. They don’t want you poaching something else and yet claiming that you are hunting hogs.

    http://blog.larrydgray.net

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