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Home Forums General Discussion Rain and snow gutters

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  chowan 6 years ago.

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  • #36853

    chowan
    Participant

    Hi been away for a while got moved and started setting up

    my off grid property in NE Nevada and I have a question about

    rain gutters I have built a combination shed and greenhouse and want to

    be able to maximise water catchment problem is i have never lived in an enviroment where such a large percentage of the precipitation will come as snow.I have visions of the snow just sliding off the roof before it can melt and be collected.I thought about french gutters I think the term is.

    any ideas?

    here is a small youtube of the shed/greenhouse

    thanks

    don

    #41502

    elnav
    Member

    The snow is going to be a problem. The slope of your green house is shallow so the snow will tend to stick and become heavy. One friend with a similar slope had the snow wight break the roof rafters.

    It all depends on total accumulation. Quite often there is a short thaw in Februrary and everyone knows to get the snow shovelled off the roof before then. If the roof is steeper slope the snow will slide off before it melts.

    Unless the overhang is wide this will now collect against the wall and form an ice dam causing yet more problems.

    If you intend to use snow as cistern water, pile it in a place where it will collect into a pond come spring.

    Then pump or drain the water into a closed tank where you are not going to get as much evaporation loss.

    That glass is fragile. Snow load can get heavy. I suggest you place additional supports under beaams during winter and early spring during snow melt. One neighbor failed to do that and ended up rebuilding the roof. I helped another neighbor to install additional supports and his roof survived.

    #41504

    chowan
    Participant

    wow here i was thinking that i put plenty of extra slope on the greenhouse

    side at least.I will be reinforcing both sides of the shed anyway but i am still left with how to catch the maximun amount of water.

    i am not insulating the roof and will have both the solar coming in

    from the greenhouse side and a small wood boiler inside for hot water

    and interior heating.

    i built the shed with the slope of the hill so that i would get thermal

    convection inside so a small heat source at the low end should warm the

    entire shed.do you think this will melt the snow at a fast enough rate

    to collect the water through simple gutters?

    or will i end up with giant ice popsicles through my gutters?

    #41511

    caverdude
    Participant

    I have thought about this too, as I travel the west I notice more snow precip than anything. It may be that collecting snow for cistern water could get you more water in the long run. Snow doesn’t run off very fast, or soak in fast. Consider getting a pond liner and collecting snow from a near flat area of ground instead of roof tops. Pond liner being black would help to melt the snow.

    http://larrydgray.wordpress.com

    http://larrydgray.net

    #41516

    chowan
    Participant

    thanks yes i already did use a tarp actually on the ground early on

    it it worked great for snow and rain except that it tended to also collect

    dust and little critters.but it was a great first catchment and it saved me a heap of water cartage.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GziKqaTnOPw

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