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Home Forums General Discussion Off-grid and illness

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  elnav 5 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #37053

    elnav
    Member

    It sounds wonderful to go off-grid and get away from communities and all that. Recent events have completely changed my mind on that subject. A nasty virus is making the rounds and both of us caught it. Its a form of bronchitis leaving the patient breathless after even just a couple of steps and totally incapacitated with any exertion such as trying to put a piece of wood into the wood stove.

    The bottom line being we used up what firewood we had indoors and was unable to go get more. The fire went out and we ended up freezing in the dark for several days until someone finally showed up who cut wood for us and rebuilt a fire indoors. Failing that we might have been really badly off. Our nearest friends live a quarter mile away but they too were down with the virus. Something to consider when planning to go off-grid

    #42487

    Dustoffer
    Participant

    What a bummer, Elnav. My wife and I have lived off grid now for over 14 years. We can not remember the last time we were sick. I have learned a lot about vitamins and supplements to keep the immune system up, arteries and heart in good shape, and liver and other internal organs doing well. We take ganoderma coffee, tea, and pills, Liv52, Essiac tea, grapeseed extract, fish and flax oil, etc. One big thing is that we don’t smoke or drink either. B-vitamins, C with bioflavanoids, zinc, a little selenium, extra D3, psyllium, and CoQ10.

    A compromised immune system is an opening for diseases. Hope you get well soon.

    #42488

    WrethaOffGrid
    Keymaster

    I am so glad you and your wife are OK (ie alive), that is scary to think of the other way this could have turned out. How are y’all doing now?

    Wretha

    #42489

    elnav
    Member

    Believe it or not Dustoffer but we do take most if not all of the supplements you mention. Last three weeks church attendance has been down to half the normal numbers. Everyone is affected.

    One thing we have noticed. When we live away from people, we normally have few if any sniffles etc. during the winter season. Hpwever, if we visit family for Christmas sure enough we seem to bring home some sniffles. I can only speculate that lack of constant exposure somehow lets our immune system relax its defenses and then when we do visit family and the kids we are slightly more susceptible and catch simething quicker.

    This year there seems to be a particularly nasty bug going around because so many people even in distant locations all report greater than usual numbers being sick and off work. And with so much transportation done by trucks, no wonder nasty bugs hitch rides with truck drivers. It only takes one infectious driver to stop for a coffe break to pass it on to the waitress who in turns gives it to the neighbors and so on.

    #42497

    chowan
    Participant

    sorry to hear that youve been unwell Elnav but you make a good point why community is the best way to go when going off grid personally i have not been sick since going off grid at all but it could for sure happen and then i am

    SOOL and i have been injured where cutting enough wood to keep warm is a problem.

    #42509

    elnav
    Member

    Some people seem to think you must have a place out in the boonies in order to be off grid. There are plenty of places where serviced or partly serviced land is available and affordable. Some places sell off properties at auction for back taxes real cheap. There is no law you must use natural gas or electricity. You can shut it off if you so wish. Its more important to have fertile land to grow food on. Being closer to civilization has many fringe benefits. Needed supplies are closer than 50 or 100 mile drive which cost money and fuel. In cases of medical emergencies or accidents with an ax or chainsaw or illness such as happened to me chances are somebody will happen by in a day or so instead of a week or month or so. There is also the social aspect. perhaps proximity of a library etc.

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