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Home Forums General Discussion Keeping cool off-grid

Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
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  • #65440
    caverdude
    Participant

    I have a friend who soaks in a bathtub filled with fresh well water a few times through the heat of the day in his back yard.

    When I get my off-grid dwelling some day I intend to include two rooms, one above ground and highly insulated, the other below ground, or at least bermed. One solution for a below ground which is more feasable is the tornado shelters. Dehumidification for anything underground is nice but not absolutely nessesary if keeping cool in hot summer is the greatest goal.

    Basically for anything underground we are talking about a “tank” that instead of keeping water in, it keeps it out. This can be achieved in several ways. But if not completely keeping water out then you must deal with the water. You would deal with it by having it run off somehow, or by pumping it out, and of course by dehumidification.

    Anything that is not passive and/or manual of course means your solution is now competing less with above ground insulation and a/c solutions.

    #65451
    elnav
    Member

    While reviewing some reports on industrial solar furnaces that melt steel I saw a video from Japan where an experimenter had adapted a satellite dish reflector with small mirrors. It occurred to me this would lend itself to driving a gas fridge to produce cool air. Only electricity needed would be for fan to blow cool air through the duct system.

    Such a solar furnace would also be useful to metal smith needing heat for heating metal to be worked, melted or just re-forged.

    Adding mirrors to a scrapped sat dish would be a low cost experiment.

    #65452
    caverdude
    Participant

    Not a bad idea at all as long as you can control the heat. Isn’t this a problem with solar concentrations? Things get too hot fast? Such as using solar heat to boil water to run a steam engine?

    #65453
    elnav
    Member

    If you study the working solar heat systems currently in use in Europe they all have shading controls to regulate how much sunlight is gathered. You must be referring to early American experiments because the rest of the world is forging ahead with solar thermal projects tht work.

    Given how much of our energy use is directed towards heat production it makes more sense to create this heat directly. Measurements have shown solar thermal is 3X as effective in using solar comparredto a photovoltaic cell.

    For low temp residential use, heat can be stored in insulated water containers. Low heat is defined as below the boiling point of water. Hot rocks or hot water storage is already a well known application in passive solar houses. Other storage solutions for heat above boiling point of water are being developed.

    I had exprresed doubt about solar food cookers for when hot meals after sun down was required. I totally forgot about hay box cookers.

    Glaubers salts have been used for a decade that I know of for heat storage and molten sodium is already used as a heat transfer medium in reactors. It is also used in non nuclear process for heat treating. Outdoor enthusiasts are probbly familiar with the phase change chemicals used in hand warmers.

    You can use solr heat instead of a microwaave or electric stov to recycle them.

    #65454
    butterflymom
    Participant

    Keep your body cooler by soaking a bandana or old t-shirt and draping it across your neck. Turn when it doesn’t feel as cool.

    Stay in the shade, don’t exert too much energy. Eat cold foods. Use as little heat to make food as possible.

    All very simplistic but bears repeating.

    #65456
    elnav
    Member

    That is pretty much what Chowan and I both related independently from when we worked outdoors in summer heat. Mind you these days we just go sit in the ‘crick’ for a while to cool down. A month ago we could not do that because the meltwater from the ice fields and glaciers was too cold. Shallow water running over areas of sun heated rocks helps bring it up to about 60F

    #65457
    caverdude
    Participant

    Well I suppose we can now talk about the military methods for dealing with heat and avoiding heat stroke. Sitting in the creek keeps the core temps down which is good. Water evaporation from clothing is good, be the water from persperation or another source. Military recommends drinking one quart of water per hour through the heat of the day. This also means urination almost every hour through the day. No urination is sign of dehydration. Also constipation or anything close is sign of dehydration. Our bodies are 96% water? Its no wonder hydration is so important. A person might want to study up a bit about heat exhaustion and heat stroke if they are exposed to too much of it as a routine.

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Viewing 7 posts - 16 through 22 (of 22 total)
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