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Home Forums General Discussion Finding county land auction & undeveloped land

This topic contains 5 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  centralpafarm 4 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #37135

    0lumens
    Participant

    I’ve been hunting for online land auction sites and have been a little bit disappointed. There is great deal of competition on many of them. I am wondering if I traveled to a prospect community and spoke with their governing body if they would have more information in regards to any easements that took place or if they can take bids for undeveloped land in their community. Where should I begin my search for like 40 acre parcels of undeveloped land in the outer lying rural communities. I live in Ohio if that helps.

    #42825

    Riverrat
    Participant

    Should be plenty in that state, issue is, it’s hard to compete with developers, especially in the current buyers market we have. Your absolute best option is find private sellers looking to sell their land themselves to the right people. In my area of Alabama, there are parcels of for sale by owner lands that have gone unsold simply because the owners respect for their neighbors keep them from giving in to developers and selling. They would rather sell to a private person looking for a home and land rather than make big profit from developers only to have them come in and break it up into small parcels and develop a big community on it. Once you do that it’s only a matter of time before the community and it’s occupants start influencing their way of life in an unwelcomed way. We have the disaster that was Hamptons Cove around Huntsville that has just short of crushed the farmers in the area even causing many of them to sell of and leave because the money in the development influenced policy, Huntsville zoned out to include the Cove and surrounding properties and the farmers got SCREWED. That’s left a VERY bitter taste in many locals mouths. Hamptons Cove is beloved by the wanna be rich people and very wealthy that live in it, and absolutely despised by others for the effect it had on the surrounding farming community. But what do they care? They got their big nice houses and massive golf course out of it all no matter who they screwed to do it.

    An auction is unlikely to benefit you when you are competing with people that can afford to pay $100k more than you for the same land simply because they plan to put up a nice fence and gate to the roadway break it all up into $50,000 one acre lots, call it an upscale gated community and make a mint when or if the market recovers.

    #42859

    0lumens
    Participant

    Hmm…thank you so much for the insight. Instead of heading to the counties government building maybe I ought to meet with locals in the coffee shop to see if one, the community is a good fit and second if someone has a parcel land, as you you said, that they would want to sell to a potential community member. I’ve seen the devastation of developers moving in to rural areas. My parents property value will drop by 1/3 when a proposed housing development is erected behind their 3 acre lot and a 1/4 mile down the road from them. Although they enjoy the pleasures of digital cable the peace of knowing a band of suburban hoodlums won’t spray paint the barn is far more valuable. Thanks again!

    #42860

    Riverrat
    Participant

    Yes sir! I’ve been adamant about recommending people getting out in their desired area and getting to know the locals, looking at plots you are interested in, and getting to know the neighbors, interacting with them, helping them with some chores. Be genuinely interested in the lifestyle out there. Let them know your plans in life, and offer to get your feet wet for free labor and help for them in exchange for nothing more than an idea of whether you are cut out for it or not before you buy. They can usually tell you all the good and bad about the property you are considering, can tell you the good and bad about the lifestyle, etc. Their advice and assistance from time to time will be invaluable.

    Get out there and meet them. It’s the best way to go about things. If you can build a good reputation and prove to be a good fit for the community, you might be surprised at what happens. Not only can you build great friendships, but those farmers in the area can hold great sway over who gets the property and for what price. Some older farmer selling off half his land because he can no longer care for it would rather take a $10k hit to get someone he can trust to do right and keep it farmable and productive rather than take a $20k profit and risk development. Trust me, I was raised as one of those.

    Maybe find a place to rent near the farm land, sometimes farmers have mother in law houses, etc that can be remodeled or something that you can stay in for the weekend in offer for free labor and experience. You get in there, earn their trust, and prove your mettle and determination to become one of them, and you’ll earn their respect. Once you earn their respect, once you dive into the deep end, they aren’t going to let you fail.

    The people that fail the most are the ones that don’t try to be involved in the farming community in any way. They just move out there with the big city attitude and mindset, and well, if you aren’t friendly to them, they aren’t going to be friendly with you. They’ll watch you fail and hope the next neighbors are better. But scratch their backs a few times, and be very friendly, and when you need it most, farmer Hank will be there with his tractor and chainsaw when you need it most.

    #42868

    The Irishman
    Member

    Very good advice and well spoken riverrat!

    #42892

    centralpafarm
    Participant

    Ditto Riverat… I have always helped my amish neighbors with their gardens especially the young families with children too young to do much work. I also give free rides since i have a hybrid and well it does help and will help in the future when i get old..

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