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Home Forums Food chickens for consumption and reselling start up

This topic contains 10 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  somanyanimals 2 years, 12 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #49585

    ghia
    Participant

    Can someone give tips on raising chickens?

    specifically on:

    MINIMAL,the most bare numbers to buy chicks (or chicken) to START for personal consumption and re selling that would EVENTUALLY grow to last year round.

     

    #49588

    WrethaOffGrid
    Keymaster

    Depends on how many are in your household who will be eating the eggs and/or chicken…. we have neighbors who buy up a dozen or more laying hens, then end up with more eggs than they can deal with, you must remember that during peak laying time (young healthy hens in summer) they will give you on average one egg per hen per day, so if you have a dozen hens, that’s a dozen eggs, PER DAY.

    Personally, if I were going to get chickens for eggs, for 2 adults in the house, I would have 3-6 laying hens, no more. If you have a way to sell the eggs, then go ahead and get more, understand that you are going to have to have a way to store the eggs before sale, that means lots of egg cartons, you will either have to buy them or begin saving cartons, get your friends, family and neighbors to save egg cartons for you, you can NEVER have too  many of those!

    Do you have customers yet? Those who want to buy eggs from you? Depending on how and where you sell, you will either have to sell “under the table” or you will have to have a tax ID and whatever health and sanitation inspections and permits necessary. It all depends on how much you want the local and state government in your life, pocketbook and hen house :)

    Are you looking for laying or meat chickens? Are you planning on having roosters to propagate your flock or will you buy more chickens as time goes by?

    Wretha

    #49589

    ghia
    Participant

    hi wretha (& everyone)

    Depends on how many are in your household who will be eating the eggs and/or chicken

    sorry I forgot to mention,It would be around 1 – 2 persons only.

    we have neighbors who buy up a dozen or more laying hens, then end up with more eggs than they can deal with

    thats exactly what Im trying to avoid. :)

    if I were going to get chickens for eggs

    how about for meat consumption?

    Do you have customers yet? Those who want to buy eggs from you?

    none of the above. :) most probably I’ll be selling under the table.

    Are you planning on having roosters to propagate your flock or will you buy more chickens as time goes by?

    ..planning to propagate the flock from the initial 6 chickens.. any tips regarding this?

    other facts : I live  on a rainy & dry tropical weather.

    summary:

    6 is the magic number for start up (egg,meat,propagation)

    thanks wretha :)

     

    #49601

    beast
    Participant

    2 hens and a rooster will give you 2 eggs a day for most of each year
    if you get multi-pu7rpose chickens youll also get meat
    best bet is 6 straight run chicks, brood them up and watch them
    keep the dominant rooster, eat the rest
    watch your hens, some will lay egs and leave them
    some will try to set on the eggs, these are your brooders
    save the best brooders then the best layers
    once you have you base flock dont collect the eggs in late spring
    for a couple weeks, youll get a whole new flock for meat
    keep track of your hens, after 2 years save a couple hen chicks
    to replace the original hens
    your original rooster will stay good for several more years
    after that buy a few chicks to improve your bloodlines
    note: if you play with your chicks the grown birds will be much
    friendlier when you collect eggs or go to butcher

    #49604

    ghia
    Participant

    hi beast ,

    your math is even simpler.i like it as well.

    3 chickens to supply 2 eggs the whole year :)

    what characteristics should i watch for the best brooder,layer?

    thanks for the inputs everyone,keep posting.

    #50766

    somanyanimals
    Participant

    some chickens dont go broody often , If you have any chicken that goes broody I would keep it. A broody mama that isnt afraid to get up once a day a drink and eat is a keeper.  If the chicken just sits there till its about dead I wouldnt.

     

    Best layers are those that lay the most reliably. some chickens will lay 4 a week for most of the year while others might lay 3 a week for half the year. in that case you know what one to keep.

    #50791

    ghia
    Participant

    thanks for the input Aardeng.

    :)

    keep posting

    #50809

    beast
    Participant

    chickens lay the most eggs the 1st year after they turn 6months old
    you might get 200 eggs or maybe more from that age group
    after that, fried chicken is damned good…lol
    barred rocks, white rocks, rhode island reds are the best multipurpose breeds
    if you want more meat try jersey giants
    if you want more eggs try leghorns
    buff orpingtons are a multi breed too but ive never liked them
    bantams are a great layer/brooder but very tiny and their eggs are small
    araconas lay pretty colored eggs and arent bad for meat
    i usually run a couple from each breed and let them cross breed
    you get more versatility that way and if you watch a much better chicken in the end

    #50812

    somanyanimals
    Participant

    depends on the breed some chickens will not get anywhere near 200 eggs per year while others will go to over 300, some lay nearly year round some lay enough to hatch out twice a year. I would keep an egg laying bird for more than a year, probably 3 maybe 4 for a good bird.  there are stories of a breed developed by the University of Arkansas that at 4 years old still lay 5 eggs per week.

     

    Most people like buff orpingtons, or any rock breed for a first time duel purpose bird. I would stick with a pure bloodline , stay away from mutts, If you breed some nice chickens they can bring in a pretty penny, a mixed breed rooster isn’t worth much.

    you also need to consider your climate when picking a breed. Some simply wont lay in the cold and others dont handle heat well at all.

     

    I spent 13 years on a chicken farm and I am about to start one

    #50892

    ghia
    Participant

    beast & aardeng

    thank you for the inputs! :)

    any technique on how to humanely end chickens for their meat

    keep posting :)

    #50893

    somanyanimals
    Participant

    I was going to go on about how humanely ending somethings life is an oxymoron but i let that out on somebody else today lol,

    there are so many methods, my old step dad would walk up behind a chicken while it was scratching and pecking and knock its head right off , instant death, a nice size stick or dowel will do it, my neighbor will pet the chicken than snap its neck quickly once its calm. most people will say the use of a butcher cone would be the most human but thats only because they dont have to watch the body flop around so  its easier on the butcher. you can kill it and leave in in a cone to drain blood for a while if you kill them any other way you have to wait for them to stop jumping  before you hang them for draining.   A butcher cone is what most hand processing facilities use.

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