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Home Forums General Discussion can you survive without money?

This topic contains 8 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  beast 4 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #45908

    beast
    Participant

    it certainly isnt easy, the govts all try to make it so we cant possibly do so
    they like us little people dependent on them, obama is a prime case
    but yes it can be done!
    there is a little know tax law that says if you have little or no income
    you can file as a hardship case and be exempt from taxes, i dont know if there is a limit to
    how many years you can do this in a row but it is there and does work
    just ask your township superviser he has the info and paperwork
    bartering is also a good step but ive seen where the us govt is trying to tax that also
    in the form of value recieved ( i hate govt, greedy buggers )
    as it says in the bible, “give unto ceasar…” the govt does print the garbage afterall
    we just need to learn to live without it
    im sure a lot of you grow and can your own food, this is a giant step forward
    although a lot of work, especially the canning part, when i was young, oldet of 9
    we would ut up over 1000 quarts of food every year, veggies, fruits and meats
    we hand dug our own root cellar to keep it in and built the walls from scrap sheet steel
    that we replaced every few years until we could afford to make it out of concrete
    there are many other things to assist us in self-reliance/self-sufficiency, like ice houses,
    springhouses, smokehouses and salthouses, all are for preserving and keeping our food safe
    wood heat is ungodly expensive if you buy it, ive always cleaned up other folks deadfalls
    and trimmed their trees, just for the wood, i think i have bought wood twice in the last 20 years
    then there are the skills and crafts that one needs to learn, like carpentry so you dont have
    to pay someone else to do it for you
    yes going the simple route is an awful lot of work but sitting on our backsides watching
    someone else get paid to do it for us isnt good for us in more ways than one :)

    #45912

    Cahow
    Participant

    Well, beast, I don’t know if this is a question or an Op Ed piece? (LOL)

    Just in case you’re looking for a conversation, I’ll play.

    You wrote: “yes going the simple route is an awful lot of work but sitting on our backsides watching
    someone else get paid to do it for us isnt good for us in more ways than one :)”

    Okay. If a person is able bodied and has the skills to “do”, then “YES!”, they are lazy sods and we should shake our fist at them!

    However, if you have a disability or just general age related problems and need to ‘hire out’, than “NO!”, they are NOT lazy sods and we should show empathy.

    For instance, my husband and I are in the beginnings of our ’60’s. There are just physical things we can’t do any longer that we hire out to neighborhood kids. Lawn care (not gardening), pet sitting when we’re gone, and I hire a local lady to do all the “ladder” cleaning that I can no longer do. I can’t climb ladders any longer to clean ceiling fans or high windows, nor can I bend my knees to clean under the beds/cabinets. It’s win/win for all of us: they get money in a hard-pressed area and we get a nice lawn and tidy home that we can’t reach any longer.

    We have a dear friend, Mathew, and he lives in Chicago, is in the Green Industry like us, and ‘only’ in his ’50’s. But, age hits hard for different people. He has his beloved Retirement Farm up for sale in Indiana; his wife has developed Rheumatoid Arthritis and Mathew has developed spurs on his feet and lower lumbar region. He’s had ads out for help with the farm, for TWO YEARS, and all he gets are pot-heads and anti-government folks who want to squat on his land and do nuttin’. So, his farm is up for sale and they will end up in the City, much to their chagrin. His wife was a preschooler teacher and like I said, he was in the nursery industry so these folks are used to hard physical work and thought they’d go into being seniors, fit as a fiddle. But, it didn’t work out that way. :(

     

    Now, regarding “money”, do you mean paper and coin? Because by my way of thinking, that’s just a symbol. Since there has been mankind, there has been trade and trade involves  using “something”–horses for sheep; beads for copper; medicinal plants of one kind for medicinal plants of another kind. Unless you literally land on a “mysterious island” with five scientists and engineers so that you can  sustain yourselves on the island, producing fire, pottery, bricks, nitroglycerin, iron, a simple electric telegraph, a home on a stony cliffside called “Granite House”, and even a seaworthy ship…then you’ll need to trade which requires something to trade in return.

    I know you’re no dummy, so you know the symbol of the globe’s money is based on having gold in reserve. So, I guess we could all carry gold dust and nuggets around with us when we need a new solar panel or rain barrel but in truth, that ain’t gonna happen.

    So, as Humans, do we need X to exchange with Y? Hell yeah! :) You wanna call it money or wampum, humans can’t survive without “money”.

    #45914

    beast
    Participant

    by money i mean the stuff the govt prints and mints
    trade and barter dont involve those

    yes im gwettin old too :P i have found a few things i can no longer do easily
    but i trade for them not pay
    i feel for your friend, this gettin old stuff really sux!
    i had to finally give up playing football and baseball in the last 4 years
    i dont seem to bounce as well as i used to….lol

    #45915

    Cahow
    Participant

    Okay, short answer: No. You can’t survive without money.

    At least not in any country of the globe that has currency.

    I doubt the SkilSaw Corporation is gonna be too impressed with a bushel of tomatoes and a basket of eggs in exchange for a 14″ diamond-blade.

    #45917

    beast
    Participant

    lol, you hqavent read my prolife
    im a blacksmith and i refuse to buy anything i can make for myself..lol
    i use old fashioned hand tools, not power ones
    i cut down trees with an antique crosscut saw i have rebuilt
    i dont use much money, i go thru maybe $600 a year for odd things i cant make do without
    but im as close to money free as i can be for now

    #45956

    Cahow
    Participant

    Hi, beast. Well, I just finished reading your profile and “Good for you!”, with what you have taken from the past and brought forward into today. And obviously, if you’re making a living doing what you do, there is a call for that. I “get” your love of slowing down time and doing things “the old-fashioned way”. That’s 100% of how I feel about baking, which is my hobby and how I relax.

    My Gran was a master baker. She ran away from her log cabin home on the Canadian border at age 13 (1901) and traveled cross-country to the “big city” of Duluth. She took on a job of kitchen scullery maid at a hotel that served loggers and miners, then kitchen maid, then assistant to the pastry chef when they saw her talent, and then head pastry chef by time she was 15 years old! From Monday through Friday, she’d be in charge of making 40-60 pies, per day; on weekends, it was from 100-150 pies per day! When she married my Granpa at age 28, she was quite an independent Miss, for those days, and Granpa had his hand’s full with her.

    They started their own dairy farm near Roseau, Minnesota, and she’d bake daily for the farm hands and family and when I was dropped off, like a bundle of laundry by my Ne’er Do Well Mum, I entered their livestyle.

    Where this is all leading, is that when my Gran passed on, I inherited 100% of her home, and it was the kitchen gear I brought immediately into my life and use, every day. I never us a mixer or Cuisanart; everything is mixed by hand, in Gran’s bowls and measuring cups, and done the way she taught me, from the 1800’s. NO box mixes! NO shortcuts! No electrity! It brings me great peace, to make tasty treats for family and friends, doing it the Old Fashioned Way.

    But, I realize this is my passion, and certainly not others, so I don’t try to convince them, otherwise. I just go upon my Merry Way, baking angel food cakes and scones, and sharing the gifts with loved ones.

    With your skills, beast, do you travel? Do you attend festivals such as The Ren Fair and other fests that feature a slower way of life? I know in Indiana, they have some kind of Pioneer Festival (went once, years ago) where they had blacksmiths and wainwrights and you could see them work, right there. It was pretty cool! :)

    #45960

    beast
    Participant

    the one major prob with living without money is travel
    cant afford to do it…lol
    so no, i dont go to those things altho i would love to someday

    #45963

    Cahow
    Participant

    beast wrote: “…the one major prob with living without money is travel.”

    Yes, sir, you are correct! My husband is Scottish and all his kith & kin are still alive, so our family goes to the Highlands at least twice a year, up in the Inverness area. My family has long since departed from this mortal coil, so having our 3 adult children spend time with their living relatives is of maximum importance to us. And of course, once there, we skip across the channel and visit the surrounding countries, which is no different than visiting different states in the U.S.

    I’m addicted to traveling and don’t see any day that I give it up. For my company, I work in the Quad-State area of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan. Last week, I traveled 380 miles to various job sites. Stayed at 4 hotels…loved every second! I have way too much wanderlust in my bones to live in one spot: always have, always will.

    #45968

    beast
    Participant

    i have wanderlust too, i just cant follow it as id like
    but im working on it
    picked up a deep water liveaboard sailboat as a haul away job
    rebuilding it for the future, maybe ill get to wander off soon :)

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