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Home Forums General Discussion save money learn to cook Re: save money learn to cook

#65822
elnav
Member

You totally missed the point. Your article sounds like something from a nutritional magazine published for yuppies. Its great that your grandmother survived living on food produced on the farm. BUT!!!

The reality in todays’s world is many people live in urban settings or rent and cannot get enough money together to escape. They feel trapped and feel the ‘system’ or establishment is digging too deep into their pockets so they cannot meet the demands of the bill collectors or save anything towards going off grid. I have lost track of how many people have told me they cannot afford to go off-grid. These are the same people who tell me to my face they cannot live on $150 per month. Yet that is all we can afford for groceries. Sometimes we have less so we need to go to the food bank. But we have never turned away a visitor from our table at mealtime. One time we met the brother in law and agreed to meet at his place for dinner. My wife went to the grocery store and picked up a few essentials and proceeded to cook a dinner for five adults plus two children for less than $10

AS an example of how to save on food. In the fall many farmers cull their chicken flock to eliminate layers that no longer produce enough or maybe aqny eggs. These birds are sometimes listed as free to any home or maybe $2/ bird.

We told a friend who is always short of money and on a disability pension about this. She says what am I suppose to do with them? Duh!!! put them in your freezer we said. This woman did not make the connection between feathered cluckers laying eggs and chicken meat in the supermarket. Incidentaqlly canning a chicken makes it more tender than just roasting it. However it takes a good cook to make such a chicken into a feast.

I saw your article condemned starchy potatoes and lumped rice along with other foods to avoid. Its all about quantity. Take two potatoes, an onion, two cups of milk plus assorted spices and my wife can feed four people.

BTW the dollar stores sell spices for a buck while the supermarket charges $3.95 – $5.95 for similar sized spice containers. Shop in ethnic food stores and also save money. The point being a good cook can make a meal with simple staples into a taste treat while using quantities that do not overload you with calories. My wife collect old cook books. She often find recipes for simple yet wholesome meals, not faddish dishes for urbanites intent on impressing their friends at dinner parties.