[before_listing images= youtube=null] My wife and I have been seriously studying the OTG lifestyle, and we’re ready to start making serious plans to move forward. Our understanding so far is that the first thing you should do is buy the land, even if you’re not ready to develop it at the moment to allow ample time for permits and such.

The problem is we have no experience in purchasing any sort of property. We’re fairly young, and have no idea how to even find the land we want. Google seems to be useless, with mostly ‘luxury lots’ showing up, while other lots are far too close to civilization for comfort- we want to be as far away from the conventional American life as possible.

Do we contact a realtor? Or just start getting out there and looking? We’re not looking to join a community, but we would appreciate a few tips here and there. Any advice would be great. We’re hoping to stay on the east coast, possibly getting as far away as WV or MD (we’re in NC at the moment), so we can stay relatively close to family.

We’re looking for one acre, more or less (more of course if the price is right) and we’d like undeveloped land. If anybody knows where we can find some good resources (and I’m sure you do) we’d love to know about them. Thanks! [landbuddy_listing youtube=null]

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3 Responses to “How to find land to purchase”

  1. Angela

    Hello, my name is Angela. Self sustainability has always been a dream of mine. I wish I knew how to get there! I want to learn how to farm, I also want to learn how to create self sustaining systems. I just watched a show on living off the grid and one house had a bicycle pump for water. I love that idea! Most of the houses I saw had solar panels, some had earth coverings that provide great insulation, some collect rain water and reuse gray water to water plants and then use in the toilet. All of this is so exciting to me. I am looking into moving to VA or NC and I am researching all my different options. I would love to hear what you have come up with and how your progress is going.

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  2. Josh

    Dovely,

    Thank you so much for your reply! Since my wife and I decided that we want to move into an ‘off grid’ lifestyle a lot has changed. Each day that passes we grow this dream. We talk about it every day, make decisions about our lifestyle that reflect how we ultimately want to live and are shedding our belongings at an alarming rate.

    Since our original post last August we have learned a great deal and have expanded our dream land plot from 1 acre to about 40+ – fully expecting it to be our job to maintain the land, produce and livestock we have.

    Internet was one of the things we identified as a necessity, as I am a programmer/developer and have decent earning potential from home. Past that we are not looking for a life of convenience. We understand that all the labor and hardship will fall to us, regardless of the time of day or weather outside. Are we ready for that? Nope! Definitely not today or even this year, but we know that it will be a necessity for continued living and try to plan with it in mind.

    I like looking back at our romanticized posts and thoughts compared to where we are now. In just under 6 months we have made huge changes to our eating, spending and daily habits, as well as our marriage and personal relationship. It’s been a great time in our lives so far and we haven’t barely dipped our toes in. At the very least this dream has brought our passion for living back.

    Your advice to reach out to others living off grid is absolutely correct. I have spoken to a few people and spend time reading blogs and forums but I know that’s only the surface. Our next big step is to try a farming apprenticeship. There are lots of farms out there looking for help and some will provide room, food, and even a stipend if you’re lucky. We think spending a few years on farms doing the same work we expect to be doing on our own land. This will be a good litmus test to see if my wife and I can hack the early rising, sweat, dirt and work.

    Thanks again!

    Josh H.

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  3. Dovely

    Check out hotpads for NC. Check out some of the northern and north western nc towns. You can get a feel for the place by using the street view on google earth. There are some really lovely small towns. Look for a place that has old farms. These neighbors will be invaluable to you as you learn to develop you new lifestyle.

    OTG is not for the faint of heart . If you have never done it, get out and meet people who are doing it or like me are working toward in stages. You said “We want to be as far away from conventional American life as possible”. You need to qualify that statement for yourself. The romantic notion of living free and independent wears thin at 6am when it’s 6 degrees out and you are bundled up lugging two 3 gallon buckets of hot water out to the barn and the hen houses. The Pekin ducks give me amazing eggs but they want that warm water after a night in the snow. My chickens lay all winter but they drink twice the water they drink in the summer. Nubian goats are hardy animals but she can’t break the 2 inches of ice on her water bucket. Then you have to go back for the feed. I’ll be doing it again in the morning! And yet it is a goal worth striving for.

    You need to make a list of what you are looking for. What your needs are. Me… I NEED a Lowes or HomeDepot within 30 miles! I need the internet because I sell around the world via my web site and Etsy. My sales support my dream. How will you survive? Can you get everything you need to live a happy life off one acre of land? The answer is no. You can’t grow toothpaste or gas. Make a plan. Talk to people who have chickens and goats and gardens. Their experiences will help you make you dream come true. You can email me at dovely@cherrylovefarmm.com

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